Women in the lead

In celebration of International Women’s Day — March 8 — FastCasual interviewed 25 of the industry’s leading ladies to develop the second annual “Women in the Lead” series.

Each woman shared how she got her start in the restaurant industry, how she worked her way up in a male-dominated field and what guidance she would give to other aspiring female leaders.

Jodi Boyce, our Vice President of Marketing, and franchisee, Qing Hammel, were interviewed by FastCasual as leading ladies in the Fast Casual industry. Read what they had to say below or check out the full list at FastCasual.com.

Women in the lead

Qing Hammel, Franchisee, Teriyaki Madness

Q: What was your first job in the restaurant industry?
A: My first experience working in a restaurant was when I opened my first Teriyaki Madness franchise store in 2016. Prior to this, I had no restaurant experience. I had previously had a successful career in the financial investment industry for almost 20 years.

Q: Why do you think the industry could benefit by having more female leaders?
A: The restaurant industry is dynamic, intense, and fast-paced. Women comprise a large portion of the restaurant workforce, especially at relatively entry-level jobs. One of the most significant benefits of more female leaders in the restaurant industry would be an inspiration. Female leaders can serve as role models and act as mentors to other women working in the restaurant industry, allowing more of them to believe they can fulfill their dream and reach their potential.

In addition, women are good at multi-tasking, well organized, balanced and efficient. The ability to manage several things at the same time while taking various factors into consideration, reaching well thought out and effective decisions are extremely important for the fast moving restaurant industry.

Furthermore, the success of a restaurant depends on a repeated customer base, loyal staff members and expanding networks. Female leaders are collaborative and are good communicators. Lastly, having more female leaders improves diversity which in turn leads to better and more creative solutions.

Q: What is your advice to women looking to make the C-suite?
A:The restaurant industry has many talented people and fierce competition. In order to make the C-suite, women should dare to dream big and have confidence in themselves. In addition, success also requires working hard and smart to win the trust and confidence of co-workers, managers, customers. Lastly, never be afraid to speak up and make yourself heard with well thought out messages.

Q: If you weren’t in the restaurant business, what would you be doing?
A: My previous career was in a male-dominated environment. If I had continued in my career, I would be working on a bond or equity trading desk of an investment firm managing risk and analytical support. I was accustomed to being the only woman working on the trading desk.

Women in the lead

Jodi Boyce, Vice President of Marketing, Teriyaki Madness

Q: What was your first job in the restaurant industry?
A: I was an Oscar Mayer Weiner Hotdogger — a.k.a. an Oscar Mayer Wienermobile driver. I traveled to 24 states with my fellow hotdoggers, handling PR and working events. I wrote press releases, pitched the media to attend promotional and charitable events, and even listened to more than 600 kids sing the Weiner Jingle or Bologna Song as an audition judge for the next commercial.

Q: Why do you think the industry could benefit by having more female leaders?
A: The restaurant industry can benefit by having more female leaders because women get things done! Women tend to be more organized and can efficiently carry projects from idea to execution.

Q: What is your advice to women looking to make the C-suite?
A:Don’t be afraid to speak up in meetings — share your thought-out ideas or your positions on discussion topics. Also, don’t be afraid to ask for a raise or promotion; the worst thing your manager can say is no. One of the most valuable lessons I learned early in my career was when I had two female VPs above me, and one of them had a much higher salary than the other. I asked her what she did to earn the higher salary, and she told me she asked for an increase in pay and stated her case for why she deserved the raise; the other VP didn’t ask.

Q: If you weren’t in the restaurant business, what would you be doing?
A: I’d hope to still [be] driving that 27-foot hotdog around the country, but unfortunately they only take college grads first year out of school. Best job ever!

Happy International Women’s Day and International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month!

                     
×
MORE INFORMATION

Teriyaki Grill Franchise
Asian Food Franchise
Japanese Food Franchise
Japanese Franchise

Logo

Logo

Logo

Logo

Logo

Logo

Show
Show